Aug. 13, 2007


Comments

 
 
 
  • It frustrates me to no end during the hiring process when I hear Managers proclaim that someone is too inexperienced or immature for entry-level positions. Rather than looking at the younger generation as an opportunity to push us to our fullest potential, we see them as a threat. I''m in the middle of Gen X and Gen Y - and most people don''t even realize it. Mainly because someone, somewhere decided to give me a chance in my career despite my obvious age. When will we stop looking at numbers and begin to look at ideas?
    Anonymous
     
     
     
  • Most interesting. I''m willing to talk to anyone that is qualified or has a desire to learn. Thing is, the Gen X and Gen Y folks come in and first thing want to know when they can take a day off... some times in the first week... show up for the interview in tank tops and cut offs, and do the minimum necessary to get by, unless you incent them to do more. The baby boomers still have a work ethic and want to help the organization first, and then believe they will be helped as a result. Like I said, I''ll try anyone with a desire, but I sure like folks that actually want to work.
    Anonymous
     
     
     
  • Interesting article. In the end, hiring decisions should be based on the value the individual brings to the organization. Age, like race, gender, religion and sexual preference should not come into play. Sure, I have encountered the self-absorbed 23 year-old who thinks you just don’t get it and resents being required to do the hard work of substantiating the merit in their ideas. But, I have also seen this laziness and arrogance in people over 50 and met many 20-somethings that exude an attitude, maturity and fresh perspective that absolutely can provide a vital component to the success of any team. I believe that creativity, passion, integrity and a strong work ethic are not based how many years one has lived, but rather are formed based on how much one has truly paid attention while alive.
    Chuck Van Court
     
     
     
  • People say that we are incentive driven like its a bad thing. There are two huge benefits here, we are easy to predict and easy to control. The thing to understand is that we are "goal" driven rather than "value" driven when it comes to the nature of the work. We work toward something rather than appreciating the inherent value of putting in a day of work. My biggest fear is the thought of an employer that has no incentives to offer.
    Anonymous
     
     
     
  • Well-written and though-provoking article.
    Anonymous
     
     
     
  • Woah, I was thinking the samething! I am a 23 year old, college educated in business and history. I have 7 years + experience in banking and a spanking resume... No luck with interviews for supervisor jobs because of my age... LAME. Wake up people, the future is here and eagerly waiting to take charge :)
    Jon
     
     
     
 
Advertisement