Digital Intelligence Do You Have It, and Can You Deliver Its Value to Your Customers?

In today's networked world, organizations that wish to reap the benefits of material improvements in efficiency must set up a new model for managing the collective intelligence about their organization. The first step is grasping the concept of centralized, collective intelligence.

 

By CU*Answers

 

In today’s networked world, organizations that wish to reap the benefits of material improvements in efficiency must set up a new model for managing the collective intelligence about their organization. The first step is grasping the concept of centralized, collective intelligence.

Collective intelligence about an organization is traditionally stored in the brains of its employees, and in static documentation such as policy manuals, procedures, and marketing declarations. In most cases, both employees and customers have to rely on the recall power of other people, since finding and absorbing what is available in static records is often inefficient.

In today’s competitive environment, organizations who can quickly deliver intelligence to their employees and customers have a competitive advantage. First, it is far easier to train employees on how to find information than how to retain information. Second, digital intelligence allows an organization to create self service transactions with the marketplace. Conversations about the organization, completing transactions, or capturing the marketplace have become electronically enhanced, so that the message reaches further and costs less in investment and resources.

Until now, most efforts to digitize intelligence have been limited to one department or situation at a time, without an overall strategic foundation for all organizational interaction. A web site reaches out to the marketplace, intranets are designed to reach in to employees and examiners, and data processing systems store intelligence about processing transactions. New concepts about self service are forcing the coordination of these different sources, to give customers a better insight into why and how they should do business with one organization versus another.

Organizations that take a strategic approach to centralizing and digitizing all corporate intelligence can achieve gains over organizations that use a piecemeal approach. A strategic approach often involves redesigning and setting new goals for resources, tactical approaches, and the long-term view of the company. Obviously this is not an easy task. Start by evaluating against the following standards:

  • The Content: How much corporate intelligence has been collected as digital intelligence?
  • The Flexibility: Can the intelligence be delivered in a way that responds directly to the situation at hand?
  • The Network: Is the intelligence centralized so it can be used at all customer contact points?
  • The Usage Rate: Is the intelligence presented in a way that it is trusted, so that it is actually used?

These standards require plans for how to build and judge content that represents the company’s vision, policies, procedures, and marketplace value. Content must then be organized so that it can be delivered in response to variable situations and conditions—like an interactive conversation, rather than just reading a book. Networks need to be developed to have the greatest possible reach, and testing and monitoring tools should be in place to evaluate and guarantee usage. Tools and resources will be required to make this strategy a reality. Every day new resources enter the market that help organizations move forward on these concepts.

What about your organization? Do you still rely on information that is static or stored mostly in the experiences of your employees and leaders? Can you afford to rely on intelligence gained through historical methods that are more expensive to use than what your competitors are using?

Randy Karnes, CEO
rkarnes@cubase.org
(800) 327-3478 ext 101

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Dec. 13, 2002


Comments

 
 
 
  • This is an issue we are addressing right now. Thanks for the input!
    Anonymous
     
     
     
 
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