Aug. 10, 2015


Comments

 
 
 
  • Thanks for considering going to sources outside this industry. To that point, and to my view concerning D. Hilton and O'Rourke, you responded to another commenter that this "article is presented as having recommendations and sourcing of opinions from field experts." Again, I think you might find that, as with me, others might call into question your characterization of those firms as "experts."
    Anonymous
     
     
     
  • Thanks again. Really do appreciate your comments and being a reader. When someone makes a fulltime living at this and has an established company, I feel comfortable using the word "expert" but you're certainly correct in pointing out its subjectivity.
    Marc Rapport
  • I think there is some very dangerous advice in.....“If they say things like ‘I’m not going to make a move for a 15% or 20% jump in salary’ and they don’t seem to be motivated for other reasons, then they probably are not in it for your members". You ignore the simple fact that employment is at its heart a give and take relationship. You are typically pulling a candidate out and uprooting them from a home, a community, friendships, other family, etc. Are you really expecting them to make such a big change for the same salary or a very marginal increase? I think the veil needs to be pulled back from your eyes and then you can take a more realistic point of view. Your opportunity or position is not the penultimate opportunity of their lifetime; you can't expect to bring the best and brightest onboard with nothing to offer but the opportunity to 'serve our members'. The 15-20% comment should be EXPECTED; otherwise, the candidates are taking most of the risk in your example and getting nothing in return. I think that comment is misguided, outdated and horribly misleading to readers of the article.
    Anonymous
     
     
     
  • Thanks for sharing your opinion and concerns and insight. I don't think I agree with it being "horribly misleading." Our readership -- and we value your input as part of that -- make their decisions on important matters such as a job change on multiple factors. I think the person making that comment was speaking to the more idealistic aspects of that kind of job choice, but I don't think anyone's necessarily being led or misled. Just informed about some different ways of looking at it.
    Marc Rapport
  • There were no other 'points of view' presented alongside the statement though; only the 'expert' opinion that if a candidate is requesting the 15/20% compensation, then it's time to move on to another candidate. The article is presented as having recommendations and sourcing of opinions from field experts, like most articles of course, but this comment runs unabated and no counter point is made. Typically, there is an alternative offered or the statement is unquestioned as it is a fundamental fact of the business (like candidates must fit the basic job description requirements - of course!). The comment was stated directly with no qualifiers as if it was a fundamental fact while it is simply not. I do agree it was cavalier in how it was structured.
    agree w/ original comment
  • Yes, the best candidates can come from inside or outside the credit union. So too can the best recruiters come from inside or outside the credit union industry. Which makes me wonder why, on articles of this nature, your reporters and others seem to rely on "credit union recruiters" like D. Hilton and O'Rourke. I'm sure each of those firms has many supporters. I am not one of them. Consider finding and citing sources from outside the credit union arena. Offering up fresh insights from outside the industry would be helpful.
    Anonymous
     
     
     
  • That's a very interesting comment and thanks for sharing your insight. I'll certainly consider that. An outside-the-industry perspective is valuable. My colleague Erik Payne does that frequently -- for instance in his blog -- http://www.creditunions.com/blogs/diversions/whats-in-your-wallet/ -- this week, and I'll look for opportunities to do the same.
    Marc Rapport
 
Advertisement