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August 9, 2004


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Anonymous

7/26/2012 04:14 PM

Good awareness article on the comparative differences between restoration and resolution.

Anonymous

7/26/2012 04:14 PM

This is not completely accurate information. Liberty Identity Theft Services, not partnered with Kroll Worldwide but with IDTheft 911, offers resolution in which the personal advocates (one assigned to each case) do most of the work for the victim without the necessity of having them sign over a limited power of attorney -- which after having one's personal information compromised offers another potentially frightening loss of personal power. If you are going to publish articles, you should have them written by objective individuals who will not personally benefit from promoting their own product or service.

Anonymous

7/26/2012 04:14 PM

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE CORRECT PHONE NUMBER IS (866)376-7878

Anonymous

7/26/2012 04:14 PM

The phone number in this article does not reach the stated contact, Benson Kane.

Anonymous

7/26/2012 04:12 PM

Interesting comment about leaving restoration in the "hands of a stranger." My thoughts exactly - but then I did my due diligence on Kroll - they were brought in to do forensic accounting for Enron, retained by the Kuwaiti government to find the funds stolen by Saddam Hussein, etc. etc. Hardly an unreputable operation when the U.S. and foreign governments retain them. Another issue is can your members afford all that time off work to weave their way through the maze of identity theft restoration? What if it happens to your employees - can you afford 10% of your workforce off trying to restore their identity? 20%? 50%? I'd suggest that credit unions weight the facts and compare the various products on the market before coming to a decision.

Anonymous

7/26/2012 04:12 PM

Restoration is nice, but after having been through the violation of an identity theft where your personal information has been compromised, do you really want to place your personal identificatrion and the responsibility for resolution into the hands of a stranger? I wouldn't. As a credit union, do you want to jeopardize your member relationship by giving another company that much power over your member?

Steve

7/26/2012 03:58 PM

The ambiguity of the following oxymoronic statement gives me cause to be concerned: "and not to mention that they are covered for something they are not." I daresay that any disseminated information related by a representative of any company should mirror the mission, policies, & practices of that company. (as in being a shining example) Me thinks this confusing statement dost speak to subterfuge...

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