Effectively Utilizing Your ATM and Branch Delivery System

With so many channels contributing to your member's credit union experience, it's sometimes hard to make them function well as a whole. By partnering with networked providers that understand they are one component of a broader member service solution, credit unions can focus on the long-term tactics necessary to strengthen member relationships.

 
 

With core processors more important than ever in linking call centers, third party networks and the Internet, understanding their perspective on achieving member satisfaction through technology is critical. Managing delivery channels has become increasingly complex. The technology required to provide effective member service has expanded. To successfully deliver member service solutions that are tied to the strategic objectives of the credit union, management must understand and separate the capabilities of its third party providers (ATMs and Shared Branches) from its own core databases. By partnering with networked providers that understand they are one component of a broader member service solution, credit unions can focus on the long-term tactics necessary to strengthen member relationships.

Knowing the questions to ask providers so that the discussion is centered on strategic goals rather than functional capabilities is the key to providing consistent member service regardless of the provider. Credit union management needs to take an active role with their providers to ensure that they are willing to adapt their solution to meet the credit union's vision. Does their solution offer the capability to cross-reference member activity across delivery channels? Can tellers be ''experts'' on each member they interact with at a shared branch? A better understanding of your technology partner's perspective on questions such as these will result in a more effective, integrated member service solution.


 

 

 

Sept. 2, 2002


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