Resolution: Begin An Email Marketing Campaign

Opt-in is a term used to describe any practice where a member must voluntarily subscribe to an email list. Just because a member provided their email address on an application does not mean that they have opted-in to your email marketing campaign.

 
 

1. What does ''Opt-in'' mean?
Opt-in is a term used to describe any practice where a member must voluntarily subscribe to an email list. Just because a member provided their email address on an application does not mean that they have opted-in to your email marketing campaign. However, this does open an avenue for you to send them an initial email explaining your plan and giving them an option to unsubscribe before the program begins (see #4 below).

2. Do I need a privacy policy?
NCUA mandates that you have a privacy policy on your website to ensure your members' privacy. Chances are, members won't be willing to provide you with their email address until they've read your policy. Three things to keep in mind:

  • Make it prominent-the footer of every page on your site is a standard placement
  • Write it in plain English-it doesn't help anyone if only your lawyers can understand the words!
  • Educate your entire staff-be sure all members of your staff who have access to private information understand what your policy is.

3. How can I collect our member's email addresses?
There are lots of places, both online and off, where you can collect a member's email address. For example, teach your tellers how to talk about your website with your members as they stand in line at the branch. Then have them ask, ''Would you like to provide an email address so we can send you more information?'' Voila! Another subscriber (and possible convert) to web banking!

4. How do I confirm or cancel a member's subscription?
With the first email that you send, be sure to remind people that they provided you with their email address and that you are sending them information that they (in some way) requested. You may have solicited this address a year ago with a marketing program in mind, but they won't remember that. Second, always include a way for someone to opt-out at any time and be sure to remove them from the list immediately. Finally, be sure to follow your unsubscribe rates for clues that you are overdoing it!

 

 

 

Oct. 10, 2001


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