What was the average borrowings-to-assets ratio in the third quarter?

 
 

Credit unions were borrowing 2.56% of their assets as of September 30, down from 2.67% one year ago due to strong balance sheet growth. At Infinity Federal Credit Union, ($275.6M, Portland, ME) borrowings amounted to 27.6% of total assets. One reason for such a high amount in comparison with the national average is their ability to make loans. Infinity’s loan-to-share ratio was 97.5% in the third quarter, significantly stronger than the 67.9% national average. Strong loan-to-share ratios are common among the top credit unions in the following table, with some even exceeding 100%.

LEADERS IN BORROWINGS-TO-ASSETS
Data As Of September 30, 2012 For All Credit Unions Over $50 Million
© Callahan & Associates | www.creditunions.com

  Credit Union State Borrowings-to-Assets Total Borrowings Total Assets
1 Infinity ME 27.61% $76,090,171 $275,557,266
2 Seaport MA 22.97% $14,000,000 $60,937,218
3 Hope MS 22.84% $35,138,736 $153,818,419
4 ESL NY 21.64% $935,339,796 $4,322,121,080
5 Fall River Municipal  MA 21.52% $46,611,867 $216,552,839
6 Fairfax County VA 20.79% $56,343,355 $270,953,818
7 HarborOne MA 20.31% $390,405,038 $1,922,571,016
8 Athol MA 19.66% $16,600,000 $84,418,039
9 Mutual Savings AL 18.68% $28,861,424 $154,480,064
10 Holyoke MA 18.53% $25,500,000 $137,647,011
11 Star One CA 18.48% $1,154,817,000 $6,249,985,008
12 San Antonio TX 17.54% $522,196,624 $2,977,866,590
13 Empower WI 17.20% $20,004,450 $116,316,648
14 Sharonview SC 17.08% $170,000,000 $995,092,515
15 Evangelical Christian CA 17.02% $187,071,619 $1,099,155,984
16 IC MA 15.95% $74,897,556 $469,548,645
17 Taupa Lithuanian MA 15.88% $3,364,000 $21,184,844
18 Red River OK 15.45% $13,558,000 $87,767,259
19 Crescent MA 15.33% $63,555,084 $414,550,741
20 Navy VA 14.92% $7,692,527,835 $51,566,559,628


Generated by Callahan & Associates' Peer-to-Peer Software.

 
 

Feb. 7, 2013


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3Q 2012 Borrowings

Comments

 
 
 
  • it would be interesting to see if there is any correlation with increased borrowings and improved earnings since these credit unions have a higher loan to share ratio. The sad news is that Regulators think LT borrowing is a bad thing when in reality, it is prudent to lock in some LT borrowings at the bottom of the yield curve, especially if the CU is carrying 1st mortgages on the books.
    BB