Which credit union posted the highest 12-month credit card growth?

 
 

As low interest rates have squeezed yields on loans and investments, credit cards have become a more critical and stable source of income for many credit unions than the past. To make up for the decline in rates, credit unions have to put much effort into increasing loan balance through more active credit card lending strategies. For the credit unions whose credit card loans outstanding as of March 2012 were over $1 million, the average 12-month credit card growth was 4.7%.

Charlotte Metro ($298.1M, Charlotte, NC) came in first with 391.4% credit card growth. Total credit card loans outstanding as of March 2013 were $8.4 million. Public Service Employees ($1.3B, Denver, CO) came in second with 207.8% annual credit card growth and $5.0 million balances outstanding. 

LEADERS IN CREDIT CARD GROWTH
Data As of March 31, 2013
© Callahan & Associates | www.creditunions.com

  Credit Union State 12-Month Growth CC Loans Outstanding Total Assets
1 Charlotte Metro NC 391.41% $8,375,928 $298,071,733
2 Public Service Employees CO 207.77% $5,017,742 $1,289,549,675
3 TEG NY 198.72% $3,598,023 $192,473,964
4 Red Canoe WA 155.44% $6,985,956 $593,549,711
5 First Service TX 128.54% $11,043,896 $365,663,324
6 Security First TX 123.59% $7,227,955 $380,951,945
7 Southwest Louisiana LA 119.24% $3,821,674 $71,507,022
8 Tropical Financial FL 108.10% $3,305,659 $561,072,697
9 Harvard University Employees MA 105.14% $24,487,099 $426,726,159
10 Jefferson Financial LA 84.78% $12,174,865 $394,887,270


Generated by Callahan & Associates' Peer-to-Peer Analytics

 
 

Aug. 1, 2013


Comments

 
 
 
  • This is great news. Its great to see credit card portfolios being brought back to life. They can be one of the most profitable products within their product mix and many FI's let them sit. With debit cards (thanks to Dodd Frank)becoming a financial frustration the credit card portfolios need to step up at many organizations. So much can be done to grow even more in these portfolios.
    Jim Heile