Consumer Sentiments and Employee Insights

Comments from online review sites can help credit unions refine their branch and call center operations.

 
 

Comments:

The tellers are all very nice. They're patient and courteous and not robotic. Have you noticed how people who work at banks these days are either so casual that they're almost unprofessional or so uptight that you feel like you just handed them a stickup note? Well, [this credit union’s] tellers are the perfect combo of familiar and efficient.
— John S., Yelp.com

One thing that often gets taken for granted is the camaraderie and teamwork we experience working at [the credit union]. It is well above average compared to where we used to be and compared to other organizations.
— Anonymous Employee, Glassdoor.com

Lesson:

Employees’ personalities can make or break a location and there is a fine line between animated and unprofessional. However, if employees are afraid to enjoy their daily interactions or be themselves, you’ve automatically muted one of your most valuable branch assets.

Bonus Lesson:

Not every employee will thrive on the frontline. Some credit unions have actually begun using advanced personality and skill set assessments to make sure they always build the right kinds of teams for the right jobs. For more information on these strategies, check out Anatomy Of A Strategic Intent in the 2Q 13 issue of Credit Union Strategy and Performance (CUSP).

Comment:

I am a member of another credit union which has a shared branching relationship. This weekend I tried to use the ATM at this branch and the dispenser drawer was malfunctioning and would not open. So today I went back to the branch to get the $200 that is missing from my bank account. The teller smiled and told me that I would have to speak with my own [credit union] about the problem. I asked her if she knew of a problem with their ATM and she said yes and that she was sorry but there was nothing that she could do.
— Nasir S., Yelp.com

Lesson:

Collaboration is one of the key ways credit unions can provide a branch network that looks and feels as big as the competition, but ownership of issues is critical to making these networks function. Regardless of what’s covered by whom, make sure the frontline thinks about and treats these partner networks as a “we” rather than a “me.”

Comment:

They don't have very many branches and the branches don't stock cash. But money orders and cashier's checks are free.
— Dzirkler, creditkarma.com

Lesson:

There’s nothing wrong with pursuing efficiency, and for an increasing number of institutions, cashless or kiosk-based branches are the right move. But for every transactional capability you change or take away, make sure there are corresponding upsides for the members and that these benefits are actively communicated.

Comment:

You have to go through a ton of training and be knowledgeable on the same financial information as CPAs and CFAs but get paid very little. Education and training bonuses are low.
— Financial Service Representative, Glassdoor.com

Lesson:

Implementing universal employees who are trained to handle every situation is a great way to ratchet up service quality for members and efficiency for the credit union. But recognize the additional efforts of these super employees as well. If financial compensation is not an option, make sure their extra training opens up expedited paths to the next rung on the ladder, or let them choose specific areas of interest they feel could suit their long-term interests as well as your needs.

Comment:

What we offer (and they think they can make) seems to always fall way short, even for high producers, leaving employees feeling like they were misled or did not perform well despite their hard work and accolades received. This is very common in the banking industry. Can we come up with something radically different? Better?
— Anonymous Employee, Glassdoor.com

Lesson:

When implementing or improving your sales culture, take the time to both celebrate wins and learn from misses at all employee levels. This does not mean that the frontline should set their own goals, or that they should not have goals at all, but it does mean they should be a part of figuring out how to hit them.

 
 

Oct. 14, 2013


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2Q 2013

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