Takeaways From HMDA

Callahan & Associates discusses the credit union mortgage landscape using HMDA data to highlight national, regional, and state trends. Plus, learn about the changing face of home ownership and how credit unions can leverage HMDA data to remain competitive.

 
 

Congress enacted the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) in 1975 to mitigate concerns about perceived credit shortages throughout the United States. As the name suggests, HMDA requires lending institutions to publicly disclose mortgage loan data on an annual basis.

Although HMDA reporting includes a nine-month lag, its depth and breadth should not be underestimated. At a broader level, HMDA data captures the state of the housing market that underlies the U.S. economy. At the local level, it tracks mortgage originators and their market share, which is gradually shifting as fintech mortgage companies become more adept at reaching potential homeowners online.

In 2015, nearly 7,000 lending institutions reported more than 14.4 million HMDA loan records. Among these, 2,000 credit unions and CUSOs reported mortgage data, making the HMDA data set the most extensive repository of cooperative lending activity within the housing market.

Callahan & Associates discusses the credit union mortgage landscape using HMDA data to highlight national, regional, and state trends. Plus, learn about the changing face of home ownership and how credit unions can leverage HMDA data to remain competitive.

DOWNLOAD SLIDES

Part 1: Latest HMDA Insights

Part 2: Rising Mortgage Leader

Part 3: Questions and Discussion

 

You Might Also Enjoy:

Homeowner Trends In The United States  

U.S. Mortgages: Credit Unions Vs. Banks

Credit Union Leaders In Total Mortgage Originations

The Truth of TRID

The 10-Year Fixed-Rate Mortgage Worth Bragging About

Back to Videos

 

Dec. 14, 2016


More On:

CLO

Comments

 
 
 

No comments have been posted yet. Be the first one.